Stereographs Were the Original Virtual Reality

Their bodies, officially, were at Flood Brook School in Vermont, perched atop stools and set among a set of comfy couches, whiteboards and cubbies. Doctors use it to show the ventricles of the heart; artists create hallucinogenic visualizations; game designers build immersive shoot-?em-ups and kookily creative tools like Tilt Brush, which lets you draw virtual sculptures in the air. This is, in many ways, often the long-term curve of media, as Schiavo, the George Washington University professor, notes. We thrill to a new medium, then quickly domesticate it: the ultimate reality of the human gaze. In June 1838, the British scientist Charles Wheatstone published a paper describing a curious illusion he?d discovered. If you drew two pictures of something?say, a cube, or a tree?from two slightly different perspectives, and then viewed each one through a different eye, your brain would assemble them into a three-dimensional view. Wheatstone created a table-size device to demonstrate the effect, with a viewer that sent a unique image to each eye: the world?s first stereoscope. A decade later, the scientist David Brewster refined the design, crafting a hand-held device you could raise to your eyes. Once Brewster?s design hit the market, the stereoscope exploded in popularity. They gawped at Tintern Abbey in Wales and the Temple of Jupiter in Lebanon, and gazed at close-ups of delicate fancywork. There were comedic, staged views, like one showing a maid sneaking out of her house via manhole to see her lover. The world in a stereoscope seemed transcendent, hyper-real. ?The first effect of looking at a good photograph through the stereoscope is a surprise such as no painting ever produced,? gushed Oliver Wendell Holmes, the American surgeon and author, in a 1859 Atlantic essay. ?The mind feels its way into the very depths of the picture. The scraggy branches of a tree in the foreground run out at us as if they would scratch our eyes out.? Soon, Holmes amassed a collection of thousands of views. ?Oh, infinite volumes of poems that I treasure in this small library of glass and pasteboard! I creep over the vast features of�Rameses, on the face of his rockhewn Nubian temple; I scale the huge mountain-crystal that calls itself the Pyramid of Cheops.? He even gave this type of imagery a name: ?stereograph,? from the Latin roots for ?solid? and ?writing.? He intentionally didn?t patent it, and this sparked an American stereography boom, as U.S. firms cranked out thousands of the gadgets. ?It was social, too,? says Heil. ?You?d see the family in the parlor room, and the grandson is feeding stereo views to grandmother, who?s looking at it.? It was called ?The Displaced,? and came courtesy of a free VR app launched by the New York Times Magazine, which you view by placing a phone in a Google Cardboard viewer. The United States?a young country?didn?t have any antiquity, so stereographers instead recorded America?s epic landscape: the canyons of the West, the soaring peaks of Yosemite. ?You could stay at home and go to France, to Italy, to Switzerland and China, and you could visit all these places by your fireside,? says Denis Pellerin, director of the London Stereoscopic Company (which still exists today). By the late 19th century, stereograph makers began aggressively pitching their wares to a huge and lucrative market: schools. ?The stereograph is a superior kind of text, and a good teacher will not have so much trust in mere print,? wrote the Underwood & Underwood company in its teacher manual, The World Visualized for the Classroom. Later, when they put their headsets down, the students told Herzog they were stunned by the intensity of the experience?and how much more emotionally they intuited the brutal dislocations wrought by war. Keystone?another stereographic company?said every American city of at least 50,000 population was using the ?Keystone System? in its schools. Studying 3-D scenes, the experts argued, would help sharpen children?s attention. ?Educators would always describe kids as chaotic and unfocused,? says Meredith Bak, an assistant professor of childhood studies at Rutgers University. ?There was this idea that you had to train kids how to look,? by giving them an ?object lesson? to closely study. The stereograph seemed to fit the bill perfectly: By sealing off a student?s vision, it removed the distractions of spitball-tossing classmates and sealed the child into quiet contemplation. ?The student would get an image and be told to look in the foreground, look in the background, notice different parts of the image,? Indeed, stereograph makers downplayed the obvious joy of the device, the better to render it educational. ?Using stereographs is not play; it is work,? intoned�The World Visualized for the Classroom. If the teacher used it correctly, it would transport the children abroad. ?It may not be too sanguine to believe that a child may be made thus to know more of the real life of foreign or of distant lands than is often known by the hasty or careless traveler who visits them,? wrote one teacher. Some literary elites were alarmed by the rise of the stereograph. Visual culture was on the rise?on top of stereoscopes, Victorians were excitedly trading photographic calling cards, watching short films, and spinning kinetoscopes of looping animations that were, essentially, like today?s animated GIFs. He lashed out, bemoaning ?a thousand hungry eyes…bending over the peep-holes of the stereoscope, as though they were attic-windows of the infinite.? Some of this was pure snobbery, as the author Heil says. Elites hated the stereograph ?because it was so popular, and embraced by uneducated people,? he adds. ?I compare it to rock ?n? roll in the 1950s.? A British government report decried stereographs of ?women undressing, showing their underclothing, and sitting in certain postures in a highly suggestive manner?; France began a crackdown. Though the craze endured for over 60 years, by the 1910s, postcards had become the hot new photo item to share and collect. Then around the same time, radio arrived, and it permanently unseated the stereograph as social parlor-room entertainment. Stereo images never entirely vanished; 3-D has enjoyed a few short vogues in movies, and as the ?View-Master? children?s toy in the ?60s. But it wasn?t the talk of the town anymore. In 2012 an entrepreneur named Palmer Luckey unveiled a Kickstarter campaign to produce the Oculus Rift, sparking a renaissance in headmounted 3-D. Today?s VR emerged largely because the technology it requires?LCD screens and tilt sensors?was made suddenly cheap by the boom in mobile phones. Are there things that cry out to be seen in VR? Is it the latest 3-D fad, or is it here to stay? The director Jeff Orlowski shot�Chasing Coral, an 89-minute-long documentary about scientists and divers who engineer a system for recording, in time-lapse imagery, the bleaching of coral reefs. Intrigued by VR, he also shot a six-minute VR film of the underwater action. ?Oceans are almost the epitome of the immersive experience,? he notes. ?Very few people go there. And of all the experiences where you want to look around in all 360 degrees, going underwater is a big one.? As head-mounted devices?such as the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive?have dropped below $1,000 (or as low as $5 for Google Cardboard), more people than ever are peering into this new realm. Jeremy Bailenson?a Stanford communications professor?has tested VR for over a decade, and has found that, deployed thoughtfully, it can indeed increase a viewer?s ability to grasp a different perspective. He?s even created a VR simulation that puts you in the position of a cow about to be slaughtered, and it?s intense enough that viewers come away upset. And while it certainly seems like a great tool for schools, the question of how it helps teach is still scientifically unsettled. Walmart is using it to train employees; Bailenson has created a firm to use VR to help football athletes study plays.

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How electric cars can be the biggest disruption since iPhone – Luxemburger Wort – English Edition

Combine all three, for example through an Alphabet investment in Lyft, and you have a new model of transport as a service that would be a cheap compelling alternative to traditional car ownership, according to RethinkX, a think tank that analyses technology-driven disruption. One key advantage of electric cars is the lack of mechanical complexity,�which makes them more suitable for the heavy use allowed by driverless technology, Francesco Starace, chief executive officer of Enel SpA, Italy?s largest utility, said in an interview. “I don?t see driverless being pushed into internal combustion engine” vehicles, he said. “Competitiveness very much depends on the utilisation of the car,” Laszlo Varro, chief economist at the International Energy Agency, said in an interview. The average Uber vehicle covers a third more distance than the typical middle-class family car in Europe, amplifying the benefit of lower running costs to the point that “the oil price at which it makes sense to switch to electric is $30 per barrel lower,” he said. This combination would be “the Uber model on steroids,” Steven Martin, chief digital officer and vice president of General Electric Co.?s Energy Connections unit, said in an interview. “Once you have complete autonomous operation of a vehicle, then my desire to own one is going to go down�and I?ll be more willing to sign up to a subscription service.” The transition to fully autonomous fleets may not match the speed of the smartphone revolution�because of the many regulatory, legal, ethical and behavioural hurdles. The rise of Tesla Inc. and its rivals could be turbo charged by complementary services from Uber Technologies Inc. and Alphabet Inc.?s Waymo unit, just as the iPhone rode the app economy and fast mobile internet to decimate mobile phone giants like Nokia Oyj. Even so, the shift to electric cars could displace about 8 million barrels a day of oil demand by 2040, more than the 7 million barrels a day Saudi Arabia exports today, the London-based researcher says. The London-based energy giant expects battery-powered cars to reduce oil demand by just 1 million barrels a day by 2035, while also acknowledging the potential for a much larger impact if the industry has an iPhone moment. “The smartphone and its apps made new business models possible,” said Tony Seba, a Stanford University economist and one of the founders of RethinkX. “The mix of sharing, electric and driverless cars could disrupt everything from parking to insurance, oil demand and retail.” “Electric cars on their own may not add up to much,” David Eyton, head of technology at London-based oil giant BP Plc, said in an interview. “But when you add in car sharing, ride pooling, the numbers can get significantly greater.” Most forecasters see the shift away from oil in transport as an incremental process guided by slow improvements in the cost and capacity of batteries and progressive tightening of emissions standards. The fundamental nature of the mobile phone business changed and incumbents like Nokia and BlackBerry Ltd. were replaced by Apple and makers of Android handsets like Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. Today, as Elon Musk?s Tesla and established automakers like General Motors Co. are striving to make their electric cars desirable consumer products, companies like Uber and Lyft Inc. are turning transport into an on-demand service and Waymo is testing fully autonomous vehicles on the streets of California and Arizona.

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Samsung looks to grow market share in smartphone space

In a market estimated to see sales of over 125 million units during 2017, the consumer electronics major has a share of 43 per cent in value terms and expects to see this going up with its range of phones across J, C and Galaxy series. Mohammad Asim Warsi, Senior Vice-President, Marketing, Samsung Electronics, said, ?India is the world’s second largest smartphone market where we have sustained our position as the no.1 mobile brand. Launching Samsung’s ‘Never Mind’ offer coinciding with the festive season, Warsi said the offer is for one-time screen replacement where consumers can replace a broken screen within 12 months of purchase by paying Rs 990 at the time of repair. This offer extends across popular models priced above Rs 9,000 and includes, J, A, C Series, On Series and flagship S and Note series. Warsi said, ?Our focus on consumer-centric innovations and providing superior products and services to consumers have made Samsung India’s top brand. ?In the premium smartphone market, which is Rs 30,000 and above, we have a market share of over 68 per cent and continue to expand.

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500-camera dome trains computer to read body language

SOUNDBITE (English) GINES HIDALGO, GRADUATE STUDENT, CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY, SAYING: “Thanks to open pose, we can process all these sequences from the dome, and we can get all the people’s location in the same for each view. And at the same time, thanks to all the information the dome has given us, we are able to train and better prepare open pose and thanks, for example, to the dome data we were able to create the first hands detector that actually works with normal RGB (red, green, blue) cameras. And that was thanks to all the data set, the huge data set that we have generated with the dome data set.” Being able to detect the nuances of non-verbal human communication could hasten the use of robots in social spaces, allowing them to perceive what people around them are doing. Self-driving cars could potentially receive early warnings that a pedestrian was about to step into the street by the system monitoring their body language. And in sports analytics, real-time pose detection might enable computers to track what individual players are doing with their arms, legs and heads at each point in the game. STUDENT, CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY, SAYING: “Panoptic Studio is a system to capture human motion without using any markers or special equipment. And the goal of the system is to understand how we move our bodies during the communication. If we don’t have markers on their bodies, the basic problem is it’s very hard to track this part in 3D space.

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How electric cars can be the biggest disruption since iPhone – Times …

The total cost of ownership of electric and oil-fueled vehicles will reach parity in 2020 for shared-mobility fleets, five years earlier than for individually-owned vehicles. The fundamental nature of the mobile phone business changed and incumbents like Nokia and BlackBerry Ltd were replaced by Apple and makers of Android handsets like Samsung Electronics Co Ltd. Today, as Elon Musk?s Tesla and established automakers like General Motors Co are striving to make their electric cars desirable consumer products, companies like Uber and Lyft Inc are turning transport into an on-demand service and Waymo is testing fully autonomous vehicles on the streets of California and Arizona. Combine all three, for example through an Alphabet investment in Lyft, and you have a new model of transport as a service that would be a cheap compelling alternative to traditional car ownership, according to RethinkX, a think tank that analyzes technology-driven disruption. One key advantage of electric cars is the lack of mechanical complexity, which makes them more suitable for the heavy use allowed by driverless technology, Francesco Starace, chief executive officer of Enel SpA, Italy?s largest utility, said in an interview. ?I don?t see driverless being pushed into internal combustion engine? vehicles, he said. The average Uber vehicle covers a third more distance than the typical middle-class family car in Europe, amplifying the benefit of lower running costs to the point that ?the oil price at which it makes sense to switch to electric is $30 per barrel lower,? he said. The total cost of ownership of electric and oil-fueled vehicles will reach parity in 2020 for shared-mobility fleets, five years earlier than for individually-owned vehicles, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Already in London, Uber plans for its UberX service to be hybrid or fully electric by the end of 2019. Steven Martin, chief digital officer and vice president of General Electric Co?s Energy Connections unit, said in an interview. ?Once you have complete autonomous operation of a vehicle, then my desire to own one is going to go down and I?ll be more willing to sign up to a subscription service.? The transition to fully autonomous fleets may not match the speed of the smartphone revolution because of the many regulatory, legal, ethical and behavioral hurdles. Even so, the shift to electric cars could displace about 8 million barrels a day of oil demand by 2040, more than the 7 million barrels a day Saudi Arabia exports today, the London-based researcher says. That could have a significant impact on oil prices?a drop of 1.7 million barrels a day in global consumption during the 2008-2009 financial crisis caused prices to slump from $146 a barrel to $36. The rise of Tesla Inc and its rivals could be turbo charged by complementary services from Uber Technologies Inc and Alphabet Inc?s Waymo unit, just as the iPhone rode the app economy and fast mobile internet to decimate mobile phone giants like Nokia Oyj. Even if electric vehicles do grow as rapidly as BNEF forecasts, the world currently consumes 95 million barrels a day and other sources of demand will keep growing, said Spencer Dale, BP?s chief economist. The London-based energy giant expects battery-powered cars to reduce oil demand by just 1 million barrels a day by 2035, while also acknowledging the potential for a much larger impact if the industry has an iPhone moment. ?The smartphone and its apps made new business models possible,? said Tony Seba, a Stanford University economist and one of the founders of RethinkX. ?The mix of sharing, electric and driverless cars could disrupt everything from parking to insurance, oil demand and retail.? The culmination of these technologies ? autonomous electric cars available on demand ? could transform how people travel and confound predictions that battery-powered vehicles will have a limited impact on oil demand in the coming decades. ?Electric cars on their own may not add up to much,? Most forecasters see the shift away from oil in transport as an incremental process guided by slow improvements in the cost and capacity of batteries and progressive tightening of emissions standards.

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Can Google, HTC crack Apple-Samsung smartphone duopoly?

But it’s still hard not to say Apple and Samsung are at the top when, combined, they make up 74 percent of the U.S. smartphone market, according to comScore, as well as 94 percent of the global industry’s profits, according to Strategy Analytics. Many have tried and failed to at least become a viable third player for the smartphone world. Google’s acquisition of Motorola was a clear attempt to take on the iPhone and Samsung. And even HTC looked like it had a shot at becoming a viable third player, with unique phone designs and high quality that actually made its phones stand out from a fairly boring pack of black (or silver) slabs. But, of course, it was not meant to be. HTC was just not big enough, and after trying to shore up sales by moving into the growing market of low-end smartphones, it lost some of its sheen on the high-end. Google has also failed to make a major dent in the market for hardware in general. It does well enough with its own phones – first the Nexus, now the Pixel – but they aren’t a main focus for the company and haven’t broken beyond a more limited market of Android enthusiasts. There have been more recent successes, such as the Chromecast and the Google Home, but they are still more the exception than the rule. An optimist could look at this partnership, which puts thousands of HTC’s engineers under the supervision of Google’s hardware heavyweight Rick Osterloh, and say that bringing these firms together will allow them to focus on a product and iterate quickly. With Google’s checkbook and the keys to the Android operating system, there is potential for an Apple-like unification of hardware and software design. A pessimist could say that there’s no reason to think that these companies, which have already been working together on Pixel, will be able to pull off a goal neither have accomplished individually. To succeed at cracking Apple and Samsung’s grip would require a shift in Google’s priorities as a company ? and we’ve had some signs of this, but we’ve also been down this road before. Rick Osterloh, senior vice president of hardware for Google, second from left, and Cher Wang, chairperson of HTC, shake hands during a news conference in New Taipei City, Taiwan, Thursday, Sept. As Richard Windsor of Edison Investment Research said in a Thursday note to investors, Google’s ?hardware acquisitions feel like unwanted orphans that have no business being part of Google. Google is biting off a big piece of device manufacturer HTC for $1.1 billion to expand its efforts to build phones, speakers and other gadgets equipped with its arsenal of digital services. At left is Mario Queiroz, vice president of product management at Google, and at right is Chia-Lin Chang, president of smartphones and connected devices for HTC.

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Consumer electronics technology event ICCE-Asia 2017 in Bangalore

The annual� International Conference on Consumer Electronics (ICCE) is the annual flagship conference of the Consumer Electronics Society of IEEE, co-located with the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.� The first ICCE-Asia event was held in 2016, in Seoul, S.Korea. , organized by the IEEE. ICCE-Asia 2017 will deliberate on the theme ‘Intelligent Living through Smart Technology’ with a mix of peer-reviewed papers from researchers and industry, invited keynotes, tutorials, and an international audience. The event features various technology tracks, Startup demonstrations, keynote speeches on how to take hardware and software products from idea to market in the Indian and International context, and Panel discussions.

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Global Respiratory Disposable Devices Market 2017- Teleflex, BD …

The industry study on global Respiratory Disposable Devices market provides comprehensive review of ongoing market trends, drivers, opportunities, challenges and issues, latest news and events including Respiratory Disposable Devices strategic corporate developments and Respiratory Disposable Devices product innovations. Overall assessments of the global Respiratory Disposable Devices market share from different countries and regions is covered in the report. The key players of global Respiratory Disposable Devices market includes Drive Medical, Besmed, Smiths Medical, Philips Respironics, Armstrong Medical, Viomedex, ResMed, BD, Dynarex, Fisher & Paykel, Hamilton Medical, Flexicare Medical, Teleflex and Ambu. The report provides detailed information about the Respiratory Disposable Devices manufacturers of the North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa along with complete information about Respiratory Disposable Devices company?s sales, revenue, production, technological developments that are used and are made along with Respiratory Disposable Devices market strategic developments. The Respiratory Disposable Devices report helps identify the biggest opportunities in Respiratory Disposable Devices industry space and offers accurate latent demand forecasting that empowers quantitative decision making among Respiratory Disposable Devices market players and new entrants. Furthermore, readers will get a clear perspective on the high demand and the unmet needs of consumers that will enhance the growth of Respiratory Disposable Devices market. Global Respiratory Disposable Devices Market analyzed the Industry region, including the product price, profit, capacity, production, capacity utilization, supply, demand and Respiratory Disposable Devices industry growth rate etc. Furthermore, Respiratory Disposable Devices report features tables and figures that render a clear perspective of the Respiratory Disposable Devices industry. Additionally, the region-wise segmentation and the trends driving the leading geographical region and the emerging region has been presented in Respiratory Disposable Devices�report.

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LG Electronics to tap beauty appliance biz

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