As Kids Get Older, Parents Get Less Strict About Proper Car Seat Use

Proper car seat use for babies and toddlers is on the rise, but there are new studies suggesting that when it comes to older kids, car seat and booster seat use rates are on a dangerous decline. State Farm conducted a parental survey and their results support O?Neill?s study, finding that two-thirds of parents didn?t anchor the top tether of the forward-facing car seat to the back of the vehicle seat. ?Without the top tether, in the event of a crash, the seat could move forward several inches, putting the child at greater risk of serious injuries,? says Chris Mullen, Director of the Technology Research Division at State Farm. Experts warn kids should remain in the back seat until they?re at least 13 and the seatbelt fits them properly because of the risks airbags pose to younger children. But as kids get older, the proper use and installation of car seats is declining, specifically when it comes to booster seat use among children aged four to seven. ?If we try to put a child in an adult-sized seat before they?re ready, then it doesn?t fit them right,? Michael L. Prince, director of the Michigan Office of Highway Safety Planning, says. ?Older children are more at risk as car seat use goes down despite boosters being less expensive and easier to use than seats for younger children.? A survey conducted by the Wayne State University Transportation Research Group �of Michigan found only 49.7 percent of children age four to seven are using booster seats at all�?despite a 2008 law requiring children to be placed in them until they?re eight years old, or until they reach 4-foot-9,? the study found. According to Dr. O.Neill?s research , another reason for the decline in safety with older children is the harness being used incorrectly in forward-facing seats, as parents don?t use the top tether anchor�on the seat.

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After tragedy, drag racer starts safe driving course for teens

After Doug Herbert?s two sons died in a car accident in 2008, the champion drag racer launched the BRAKES charity to teach safer driving to teens. “It became my therapy to see my boys’ friends come in, and I was able to do something that would help them for the rest of their lives,” Herbert said. The four-hour sessions are open to teens ages 15 to 19 who have a learner’s permit or a valid driver’s license and at least 30 hours of experience behind the wheel. The classes, taught by ex- Secret Service agents , police officers and professional race car drivers, are intended not to give the basics on how to operate a car, but on how to react in common dangerous driving situations. These include avoiding collisions; skid recovery for driving in bad weather; and a “drop wheel” recovery exercise to train students how not to overcorrect when the car goes off the road. The courses begin with Herbert telling his own story, which includes showing a photo of the scene of his sons’ accident. The twisted hunk of metal on the roadside is barely recognizable as a car. But in January 2008, a tragedy changed the focus of his life. Though the course is free, BRAKES requires those who register to make a $99 deposit, which discourages no-shows. “We have cutouts of someone walking a dog, someone riding a skateboard, an old man crossing the street,” Herbert said. She also had to examine a semitrailer and learn where its blind spots are, which provided a lesson on not following too closely. “It was very difficult,” Strother said. “When you’re in a situation where you have to think fast and react quickly, one or two seconds make all the difference.” Illinois is one of the few states that has mandatory driver’s education written into the law for public high school students, noted Steve Scott, treasurer of the driver’s ed association. But he has noticed a disturbing trend at some high schools, with kids doing classroom time but not getting hands-on training in a car. In regular driver’s education classes, which involve six hours of behind-the-wheel time, it is difficult to teach evasive maneuvers like skid control. “We don’t have the time and concentrated effort to do that,” said Scott. Last week’s quiz asked what 1920s avant-garde orchestral piece imitates the sound of a steam locomotive? Joe Tesoro of Ridgewood, N.Y., was the first with the right answer. Thanks to Richard Wyszynski, a classical musician and conductor from Ukrainian Village, for the suggestion. The ship in this song goes down with an unusual cargo, including the skins of old, visually impaired horses. The first person with the correct answer gets baseball cards and a Tribune notebook. This expanded to become BRAKES ? “Be Responsible and Keep Everyone Safe” ? a charity devoted to teaching safe, defensive driving, which so far has offered classes to 26,000 teens and their parents across the country. The North Carolina-based BRAKES is coming to the Chicago area for the first time next month, with classes at the Schaumburg Boomers Stadium on Oct. Car crashes are the leading cause of deaths for U.S. teens, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2015, the most recent year with available statistics, 2,333 young people ages 16 to 19 died in crashes, or more than six per day, the CDC said. Herbert said he hadn’t realized how big a problem this is until he lost his kids. “It was a wakeup call for me,” Herbert said.

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Knowledge saves lives: Children rely on us when it comes to car safety

The two small children in the backseat didn’t have a scratch on them due to the fact the they were wearing their seat belts,? ?You are neglecting your child and putting their lives at risk if you are transporting a child without a car seat. NewsOK BrandInsight provides a place for local organizations and companies to connect directly with the NewsOK audience by publishing sponsored native advertising articles of interest on the NewsOK digital platforms and to participate in the resulting conversation. ?Nationwide every 33 seconds in 2015, a child under 13 was involved in a crash,? said Paul Harris, director of the Oklahoma Highway Safety Office. ?Using car seats that are age- and size-appropriate is the best way to keep your children safe.? According to NHTSA, motor vehicle crashes are a leading killer of children, and fatalities are on the rise. Harris added. ?Car seats matter, and having the right car seat installed and used the right way is critical.? ?Making sure that you are using the correct car seat, the right way and ensuring that it is installed correctly gives child passengers the best chance at surviving or reducing the severity of injuries in a crash,? ?Modeling safe behavior makes a huge impact on our children,? she said. ?It is important that we not only think we know but follow through and know that we know how to correctly use the right seat for the child?s age, size and needs.? Owner?s manual?s ? for both car seat and vehicle – can be very technical and hard to understand leading to frustration and improper use. BrandInsight content is produced by the organizations and included in this special section as a service to NewsOK readers. Once a child outgrows the rear-facing-only infant car seat, she should travel in a rear-facing convertible or all-in-one car seat. Once a child outgrows the rear-facing size limits, the child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether. After that the child should ride in a booster seat until he is the right size to use a seat belt safely. Oklahoma law requires children under two to ride in a rear facing car seat, a harness until their fourth birthday and a booster seat until 8 years old or 4?9?. NHTSA reports that about 25.8 percent of children 4 to 7 who should be riding in booster seats were prematurely moved to seat belts, and 11.6 percent were unbuckled altogether in 2015. Herring added. ?As a parent it is vital that you stand your ground when your child protests using a seat belt or even a booster seat at this age.? There are some children even at 10 that should still be in a booster seat until the seat belt fits them properly. Car crashes are a leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 13. Many times, deaths and injuries can be prevented by proper use of car seats, boosters and seat belts. ?This is also the age when kids want to sit in the front seat,? she said. ?Stand firm that your child should ride in the back seat until they are at least 13 and 100 pounds. Even if the seat belt is used appropriately the impact of the airbag on a child under 13 and 100 pounds can cause serious injuries.? ?The biggest breakthrough for Oklahoma has been the passage of our updated child passenger safety law that follows the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for safe transportation,? Herring said. ?Education, legislation, law enforcement and engineering are the keys to reducing and preventing fatalities and injuries.? ?Knowledge is power, and the more that a parent knows about car safety, the more power they have to potentially save a child,? Dr. Ryan Brown, an emergency medicine and child abuse pediatrics physician at The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center, fights every day to save the lives of young car crash victims. ?There are a lot of urban myths that more people die in car accidents because they were wearing their seat belts than those who weren’t wearing a seat belt,?

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Long read: Why car industry is worried

Sticking a camera at a car production line cannot do justice to the sheer magic of the making of a modern motor vehicle. The right front-end module of the right Mini joins the assembly line at precisely the right time for the body of the car. So big, as to raise doubts as to its viability in the industry as a whole, though some individual plants might be able to get there. The German carmakers, who we were told would dictate a great cake-and-eat-it trade deal with the UK to Chancellor Merkel, are not doing that, preferring to value the single market upon which their businesses are built. In any event the German carmakers are in no position to dictate anything to politicians, licking their paws after the diesel scandal. Transition, implementation or a standstill looks likely to be the aim of the PM’s speech in Florence – her Italian job. Imagine what happens when engineers responsible for this type of meticulous system attend a meeting with the Government about its Brexit plans and strategy. The chance to communicate with finance directors about the legal and trading environment that needs to be in place in just 18 months’ time may well produce an initial rush of relief. At this stage, the shock is significant at hearing from Government that not only does it not know exactly where the UK is going to land, but further that it does not know how these systems work, and that the meeting is in fact about attempting to find out how the car companies’ logistics and customs systems function. An internal industry memo circulating at the Frankfurt Motor Show, revealed to Sky News, described a recent “disillusioning” meeting with the Government on Brexit customs arrangements and “a lack of detailed information and blocking of our questions” which attendees concluded was a “desperate attempt” to get the industry to solve the customs conundrum posed by the Government’s approach to Brexit. The car companies have been generally appreciative of the work of the Business Department in trying to square circles, but have become increasingly alarmed by the direction of travel in rhetoric. They have noticed, for example, that a year ago the Prime Minister at the Conservative conference promised that UK firms would continue to trade freely and “operate within” Europe’s single market. At the Frankfurt Motor Show, a Toyota boss expressed concern that assurances from Government on a tariff-free outcome to negotiations had been made at the time of a �240m investment in its Burnaston plant in Derbyshire, but “not any more”. Back at the Mini plant, the finance chief Jeremy Stoyle shows me the assembly line. Ninety-five percent of the parts currently require no tariffs, no checks, no customs, and flow entirely freely. “As frictionless as possible” is a pretty meaningless phrase in a place like this. Their initial contingency planning for a worst-case scenario points to an increase in stock levels from two to three days, to a three to four days in order to account for a likely daily 12-24 hour delays at docks. Certainly it is now standard process for all car companies to get their plants across the Continent to compete against each other aggressively for new production work. The preferred solution to all of this among Cabinet Brexiteers is a massive expansion by the Government of what is known as Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) status, and this was mentioned in the Department for Exiting the EU’s customs paper. This is a European Union scheme for manufacturers to handle customs arrangements for non-EU parts internally, subject to certification and checks. Privately the industry is scathing about the idea, gaining AEO status is “the devil’s work” and there is “no chance” for the entire supply chain to do that. If this was a serious proposition, the manufacturers would have to be building office blocks for internal customs facilities right now. The Government points out that the gloom and doom is undermined by a series of high-profile plant investments over the past 12 months, from Nissan, to Toyota, to the Mini plant itself. Niche players such as McLaren are doing well out of the competitiveness of a cheap currency. It contains a crankshaft, a �400 precision-sculpted metal part that transfers under several tonnes of pressure the motion of the pistons into the rotational motion of the flywheel, which will turn the wheels of the car. The new part of it – the electric powertrain – will be manufactured in Bavaria, unlike most of the existing engines currently made in Warwickshire. It is equipping other continental factories with the systems to produce the car. The head of the German Automotive Association, the VDA, Matthias Wissmann, argued: “At the moment we still have internal market and the Government is promising to these companies that they will keep the market open. Some in the industry are a little tired of the Government trumpeting small investments as endorsements of its Brexit strategy, with one refusing to allow a Cabinet minister to conduct celebratory interviews from its premises. Overall investment figures in UK automotive were sharply down, according to the SMMT, to the lowest on record last year of �1.66bn, and has halved again so far in the first half of this year to just �322m, as companies await certainty around trading conditions. Some in the industry are a little tired of the Government trumpeting small investments as endorsements of its Brexit strategy, with one refusing to allow a Cabinet minister to conduct celebratory interviews from its premises. They claim there was “zero chance” of executives from major car manufacturers signing up to the Government’s aborted attempt to get a public letter of endorsement from businesses. At precisely this moment, the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson’s response to the car industry conundrum was to say that “traditional carmakers will vanish” within 20 years, to be replaced by automated cars. There certainly is a revolution occurring in the automotive sector, and judging by the Frankfurt Motor show, the industry is well aware, with never-ending displays of autonomous driving and electrification technologies. The industry dismisses the idea of a separate set of UK automotive standards. For the UK – a small manufacturer producing one million cars per year – to break out on a global scale with a new set of rules just complicates things even more and would be very unfortunate.” Jaguar Land Rover goes further, saying the Government already accepts that there will be no deviation from European standards at all. “We made it quite clear that there is only one set of compliance in Europe – (there are) no noises from the Government that they (expect) any different from that,” says Mr Goss. Margaret Thatcher’s promotion of foreign and particularly Japanese investment into the UK went hand in glove with the creation of the single market with one set of rules, and an arbiter, the European Court of Justice. The cars are then tested thoroughly before being driven in convoy up and down the ramps of the plant rail station on to a double-decker train heading for Purfleet or Southampton docks, and exported back to Europe or beyond. As Opposition leader she visited Japan in 1977 to meet with Nissan’s then boss – Katsuji Kawamata – and badgered the Japanese PM at G7 meetings. In 1982 she persuaded Nissan to invest in Sunderland partly by telling Mr Kawamata that “dependence of Britain on exports to Europe meant no realistic prospect of leaving the European Economic Community”. And ultimately in 1989, when exports of Nissan’s UK-made Bluebird faced being shut out by the French, who saw the Sunderland plant as a Trojan Horse, she forced President Mitterrand to back down. How? By threatening to take Paris to the European Court of Justice for a case they would surely lose. That is one of the reasons the Japanese government published an extraordinary memo last year stressing for Britain to “consider seriously” that its businesses had invested heavily in the UK after being “invited by the Government” to use the country as “a gateway to Europe”. It is perhaps of little surprise that in seeking reassurance on Japanese trade, Tokyo extracted a surprising concession from the PM on her recent visit. It is impossible not to imagine the music to the Italian Job, but a spot of Stravinsky would not shame the timing, precision and sheer choreography required to make this work. In a little-noticed signed joint ‘Prosperity Cooperation’ declaration with the Japanese PM Shinzo Abe, Theresa May promised to “support the lifting of EU import restrictions on food and feed from Japan, including those from Fukushima where they have been scientifically verified as safe”. The PM also agreed that any UK-Japan trade deal would have to follow the conclusion of the EU-Japan deal, and would be based on it. This rather suggests that for the world’s number three economy, in the car industry at least, the UK will not be in a position to trade independently of the EU. A rule-taker on standards, and a negotiation-accepter on trade. All this could come to a head quite quickly at the Ellesmere Port Vauxhall plant, which exports 80% to Europe, with a decision over the Astra. And Carlos Tavares �- chairman of Peugeot’s managing board – told German journalists: “We don’t know how Brexit is going to unfold… all this completely changes the business model for Vauxhall and Peugeot and Citroen.” But Jaguar Land Rover is perhaps the most important, as it is a great success story, less connected to Europe. This is just-in-time manufacturing across a pan-European integrated supply chain, and its constant refinement over years is responsible for the raging recent success of UK car production, under mainly foreign ownership, from Sunderland to Swindon. In theory it should be delighted by the opportunities of a cheap pound and trade deals with the US and China – big consumers of their high-end cars. Trade deals with the US and China? “If only life were that simple,” says Mr Goss, pointing out that 40-50% of its parts including expensive German gear boxes are imported from EU suppliers. In fact, in order to qualify in new trade deals there will have to be a massive increase in locally sourced components.

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This Hi-Tech Shirt Knows More About You Than You Know About Yourself

One early finding was surprising: Tony often held his breath for long periods. “Especially on road tracks under heavy G-force loads,” Adam says, “he tended to hold his breath. Tony held his breath too long, and we knew he could help stave off fatigue if he focused on breathing.” “Our engineers also noticed an unusual EMG signal,” Adam says, “so in the second year we put sensors in the upper arm of the shirt to started capture muscle activity. By plotting his grip strength and grip consistency, we could show him where he was gripping the steering wheel tightly when contextually (where he was on the racetrack) he might not need to. For example, he could relax and release his grip a little earlier as he came out of a turn.” It turns out the problem wasn’t all due to dehydration; Tony was just gripping the wheel extremely tightly. “He’s such a strong guy,” Adam says. “It’s like he couldn’t help it. When he realized that he changed his training to do more cardio and lose a little muscle mass. During the third year of the project the focus expanded to include heart rate and aerobic activity during races. “When he saw his heart rate variation,” Adam says, “he decided to change his training so it’s closer to what he experiences in the car. We can capture comprehensive data, analyze it to understand patterns, and provide insight to Tony that he can actually use.” “For years, I never had any data about myself while I was driving the car,” Tony says. “How I could be more fit, why I cramp, how I should train… “Now that I’m wearing the shirt, if I’m using my left arm too much, they can tell me on the radio. Now I not only know all these things about myself and how I should train, my team can let me know during a race if I need to change not just how I’m driving the car but how I’m performing as an athlete.” On the plus side, incredibly sophisticated data collection tools allow your team to understand nearly every aspect of your race car’s performance – and identify ways to make it even faster. The most actionable data is real-time data, but syncing the signals from the shirt with the race car to provide real-time data was a definite challenge. The Ganassi team worked with NTT Data to run hitoe signals directly through the car’s telemetry system; that way bio-signals could be paired with the car’s speed, braking, steering wheel input, load forces… so what Tony was doing matched could be paired with what the car was doing. It’s nice to know what happened, but in many professions – like healthcare – knowing what is happening right now matters a lot more. Reviewing the bio-signals showed that the majority of the shift was tired around midnight. The bad news is that, aside from years of experience and highly informed gut feel, you have almost no data to help you understand all the variables that make up your performance as a driver, much less identify ways you can become an even better driver. Since a tired employee is a less effective employee, building in an earlier break time helped alleviate the problem. Imagine you run a manufacturing plant and have employee dashboards that match every employee’s bio-signal patterns with ambient temperature, humidity… think about what you could do to improve safety and avoid risks. “One of the best predictors of getting back to a normal life after surgery,” Adam says, “is pre-surgery exercise. Pair that to a video chat and the provider could provide feedback and coach the patient, which could be a great motivator to get people to prepare themselves for surgery – and to recover after surgery.” “What sold me on this,” Tony says, “was that I could play a part in developing technology that healthcare systems will use with their patients. Unless you’re Tony Kanaan , the 2004 INDYCAR champion and winner of 17 races including the Indianapolis 500. As a race car driver, we work with Honda to make better cars for the street. During every race, Tony wears a special garment created by his sponsor, NTT Data , that incorporates hitoe , a material that acts as a sensor to capture electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate, and electromyogram (EMG) data. In simple terms, Tony’s hitoe shirt collects data from his heart and muscles that his Chip Ganassi Racing team monitors in real time during the race. In fact, Tony was so physically fit that he was able to compensate for some of what was happening in the car.”

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Americans are right not to trust self-driving cars

We Americans adopted the car like no others, won the race to the moon, love our smartphones and smart homes, and are accustomed to seeing self-driving or flying cars in almost every movie set in the future. But to ignore crowdsourced gut feelings around a revolutionary change to a building block of our current societal topography is to fail to meet consumers where they are. Serious questions emerge when lawmakers provide exemptions from Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, as the House of Representatives did earlier this month , to an industry that has a history of fighting safety features. Every delayed disclosure and incomplete recall increases the potential of incidents leading to loss of lives and limbs. Sadly, the relevant expert safety agency, the Transportation Department?s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, has a spotty history when it comes to putting the interests of the American people first. Over the years, safety advocates (including my own organization) have routinely taken the NHTSA to court to force it to do its job. This has included ? but is certainly not limited to ? forcing auto manufacturers to issue complete recalls and sufficient remedies and requiring companies to implement widely available safety technology, such as seat belts, air bags, electronic stability control, roof crush protection and automatic emergency brakes. The auto industry fought at too many points in the process, and too often the NHTSA and other officials went along for the ride. Even today, when no one would think of purchasing a new car for their child, themselves, or their parents without air bags, we are in the midst of an enormous recall of Takata air bags, which were installed in millions of vehicles in the United States even though Takata was allegedly aware of a dangerous safety defect. Congress?s current approach would delegate to the NHTSA the responsibility of writing policies for autonomous vehicles, particularly on safety, cybersecurity, consumer privacy and disclosure of crash data. Yet, the NHTSA does not seem to want the job, recently weakening an existing set of voluntary guidelines on autonomous vehicles. Unfortunately, this should not be a surprise, as the NHTSA has not bothered to write mandatory rules or enforce the law on much simpler issues. It has repeatedly delayed requiring manufacturers to install rearview cameras to prevent children from being hit as a car backs up. And it has yet to implement rules requiring back-seat safety-belt warnings. Since the NHTSA cannot ? or will not ? take on these less complicated challenges, it is hard to believe that it would ever stand up, say, to an industry objecting to notifying the public of cybersecurity breaches ? even if the breach could happen to a car without a steering wheel or brake pedals. Ride-sharing pioneers such as Uber and Lyft are on board, and the auto industry has invested billions in the concept. Progress marches on. Embracing its benefits can be more useful than simply objecting to change for the sake of the status quo. The cars of tomorrow can ? and should ? be the safest, highest quality and most environmentally friendly vehicles ever developed. One can understand the economic potential for such cars, but Americans are right to be concerned about a lack of oversight and absence of corporate caution in the rush to be first. Self-driving cars potentially represent the greatest step toward automotive and pedestrian safety since universal installation of the air bag. Only 13 percent of those surveyed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology agreed they would be comfortable with vehicle ?features that completely relieve the driver of all control for the entire drive.?

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Daimler AG Ready To Bring Electric Trucks In India – NDTV …

On the sidelines of its new Euro V compliant truck launch, Daimler AG’s said that it is ready to introduce electric trucks and buses in India, provided it finds the infrastructure support, partnership and cooperation from local civic bodies. Commercial vehicle maker Daimler AG has completed five years in India with the Bharat Benz brand and expanded its portfolio with the country’s first ever Euro V compliant truck. Daimler further said that if it gets the opportunity to bring electric trucks to India, the company will first run the same in metropolitan cities. The manufacturer could bring medium-duty electric trucks first in the country and do the pilot run in cities like Mumbai that provide the upscale infrastructure for an electric vehicle. The automaker already has a programme for electric trucks internationally and is working with local companies across different metropolitan cities like New York and London to find the right charging facility for e-trucks. On the sidelines of the launch, the manufacturer, while interacting with the media, said that it is also exploring the option of introducing electric trucks in the country. Hence the Euro V compliant medium-duty truck was launched in the country, just months after the company upgraded its entire fleet to BS-IV emission norms. Bharat Benz says that it has the technology to upgrade to BS-VI and already exports models from its Chennai plant to international markets. Having launched the Fuso e Canter electric truck in New York last week ahead of Tesla’s upcoming electric semi-truck, the German auto giant said that it has the technology, products and understanding of producing electric commercial vehicles and is ready to bring the same to India. Speaking to the media, Head of Daimler Trucks Asia, Marc Llistosella said that the firm is ready to bring electric trucks to India, provided it gets the infrastructure support, local partnership and cooperation from the local civic bodies. The company harped on the fact that while the technology was present with it Internationally, India was yet to provide the right infrastructure to support electric vehicles. The statement only adds to the uncertainty of the country reaching the government’s plan of becoming an all-electric nation by 2030.

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Mahindra Open To Sourcing Batteries From Maruti Suzuki For …

With Suzuki setting up its own battery manufacturing joint venture in Gujarat, Mahindra says it will be open to the Japanese company being its supplier for batteries in the future. Just days after Maruti Suzuki ‘s parent company Suzuki Motor Corp announced its electric battery joint venture in Gujarat, there may already be some customers lining up. While committing Rs 1151 Cr investment towards the said plant being built with JV partners Toshiba and Denso, Suzuki had said it would be open to supplying the batteries to other OEMs. While it has a big strategy to use the batteries for hybrid and all-electric Suzuki cars exported and sold in India too, that may not be enough economies of scale. With the government announcing that it wants the entire market to transition to electric vehicles by 2030, that should not be hard to do. The car bazaar in India is set to go over 3 million units by next year, and is pegged to be twice as large by 2030. But given that Mahindra is already a supplier of electric cars to markets in India and overseas, it cannot wait until Suzuki’s plant is operational in a few years. And I can tell you very quickly without telling you the price or the supplier, that we have managed to reduce the forward costs of our batteries lets say two years from now by a dramatic amount.” Mahindra says that it will therefore always look to get the best pricing – whoever the supplier of batteries may be – and also consider more than one vendor for them. While conventional wisdom may say that it would likely to suppliers with manufacturing in India, innovation or technology may compel OEMs like Mahindra to also source batteries from overseas too. Mr Mahindra says, “If somebody gets up in America like Elon Musk and invents a technology that is so superior – that’s is only available in the US – we will buy it from there too.” And Mahindra – with its own ambitious and far-reaching electric plans says it would consider sourcing batteries from Suzuki. “I would be very happy for Suzuki to make the plant.

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How Technology Helps Car Tires Get a (Better) Grip

Two new concepts seen at the Frankfurt Auto Show use embedded sensors to monitor pressure and temperature and allow for changing a tire’s contact patch on the fly. And while ContiAdapt is a bit further in the future?though not as far away as Michelin’s Vision concept?ContiSense could be coming to a road near you soon. ContiSense uses sensors embedded in specially developed, electrically conductive rubber to constantly measure tread depth and temperature and send the info to an in-car receiver. Continental plans to evolve ContiSense, which could be on the market in five years, so that it can also send information about road surfaces, including temperature and the presence of snow or water, to the car or a driver’s smartphone via Bluetooth. The small patch of rubber that contacts the road and a car rides on has almost as much impact on acceleration, braking, and cornering as some mechanical parts, and can greatly affect fuel economy. The holy grail for tires is if a single circle of rubber could be adjusted on the fly to adapt to various driving styles and weather conditions and dynamically adapt for optimal fuel economy. From camera-based rearview mirrors to engines and transmissions that can adapt to the terrain ahead based on GPS and other information, many traditional car parts have gone high-tech. ContiAdapt gets closer to this ideal by using micro-compressors integrated into a wheel with a variable-width rim to alter the tire pressure accordingly. A smaller contact patch formed by increasing the tire pressure creates lower rolling resistance and thus more energy-efficient driving on roads that are smooth and dry. But a larger contact patch caused by lowering tire pressure delivers better grip on slippery roads, and the pressure could be lowered even more to help a vehicle maneuver better, say, in deep snow or on icy roads?without having to get out of the car to let air out of the tires in the middle of a blizzard. The rechargeable part means that the tread can be changed to adapt to various road conditions, climates, and driving styles. But the French tire giant mentioned at the unveiling of the concept in June that it could be at least 10 years or more before the technology sees the light of day.

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Waymo and Intel Collaborate on Self-Driving Car Technology

Intel?s collaboration with Waymo ensures Intel will continue its leading role in helping realize the promise of autonomous driving and a safer, collision-free future. Self-driving technology can help prevent these errors by giving autonomous vehicles the capacity to learn from the collective experience of millions of cars ? avoiding the mistakes of others and creating a safer driving environment. Given the pace at which autonomous driving is coming to life, I fully expect my children?s children will never have to drive a car. With so much life-saving potential, it?s a rapid transformation that Intel is excited to be at the forefront of along with other industry leaders like Waymo*. Waymo?s newest vehicles, the self-driving Chrysler Pacifica hybrid minivans, feature Intel-based technologies for sensor processing, general compute and connectivity, enabling real-time decisions for full autonomy in city conditions. As Waymo?s self-driving technology becomes smarter and more capable, its high-performance hardware and software will require even more powerful and efficient compute. With 3 million miles of real-world driving, Waymo cars with Intel technology inside have already processed more self-driving car miles than any other autonomous fleet on U.S. roads.

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