Col. Wilkerson: Trump’s Proposed $54 Billion Increase in the Military Budget Not for National Security

Col. Wilkerson: Trump’s Proposed $54 Billion Increase in the Military Budget Not for National Security

Larry is the former Chief of Staff for US Secretary of State Colin Powell, currently and Adjunct Professor of Government at the College of William and Mary, and a regular contributor to Real News. PAUL JAY: Does America in order to defend itself need another 10% in the military budget? It needs a substantial cut in the military budget, and that would enhance national security because it would force the Pentagon, the military, to do some of the things that they need to do to make the future better. I understand, too, that this $54 billion or whatever it is, it’s not clear whether it’s going to come out of the authorized line or going to go into the authorized line or go into OCO, the Overseas Contingency Operations slush fund, which needs to be killed entirely. And the payers in this are just ridiculous. The EPA, State and US aid, as the bigger bill payers, and as I understand it, too, some of the safety net programs, although he’s promised to – but I don’t put much store in his promises – to keep Medicare, social security and other essential programs like that going. We simply don’t have the money to do all of this and the fact that we have a 600-plus billion dollar defense budget and, really, a 1.1 or 2 trillion dollar national security budget, when you throw nuclear weapons and the Department of Energy, the VA and all the rest of the security budget in there, is just ridiculous. We have a bigger national security budget than the rest of the world combined. PAUL JAY: One of his campaign promises in one of the speeches he was critiquing the regime change policy in Iraq. For a time he critiqued it in Libya, although there’s some video surfaced how he actually wanted to send US troops into Libya, so that was a bit of a con. That being said, at one time he actually said, “Don’t you worry, military guys – meaning military-industrial producers, war manufacturers – there’ll be plenty in this budget for you, too.” The main promise seems to have been to the industrial-military complex. LARRY WILKERSON: Well, he’s keeping a promise to them to keep their money flowing and their jobs intact and so forth, and that’s one of the first things that you do to get their vote. As I understand it, he probably got the military vote, certainly in the enlisted ranks, and he probably got a lot the defense-industrial complex vote, too, for the very reason that you just suggested. This is what presidents do to keep that vote in their pocket, and also to keep the American people writ large with that all important security issue at least potentially in their pocket, if not already there. And we know we… you and I have talked about this before, he’s certainly… his foreign policy speeches and those of the people in his Cabinet more or less have all said Iran is the problem. There’s been the suggestion that he’s … Trump’s speech at the CIA, where he talks about how “if I’d been the president we would’ve grabbed the oil,” and then he says, “Maybe we’ll have another chance.” Because all of those things you suggested, plus a number of others I could conjure up would not be good for this country, not in our national interests, primarily because prima facie they’re not in our national interest, but also because we can’t afford to be doing these sorts of things. Where are we going to get it? Print it? We’re going to go out with war bonds to the American people or maybe to the Chinese or the Japanese or the British, our biggest benefactors? We’ve gotten $4-plus billion over the last year or two in this quantitative easing program simply by going to the Treasury and printing it, or to the Mint and printing it. Now, this is unsustainable. PAUL JAY: Well, the argument they’re giving is that the American armed forces, their hardware, the cyber warfare and such, it all needs to be modernized. That’s an increase of $54 billion from approximately $600 billion that will be paired with cuts to other agencies. I’d be talking about things like 3D printing, robotics, artificial intelligence, and other technologies that are coming on so fast that they’re going to make all these legacy systems, which are extremely expensive, and make them for the military-industrial complex, of course, a lot of money, passé. 3D printing a submarine that’s unmanned, and that’s the future, Paul – not manned flight, not manned unmanned. You put a submarine under the ocean and hang a few smart torpedoes, smart mines on it, and you go out – and by the way, for the price of an Nimitz class carrier, a Ford(?) class carrier, you can build about 150,000 of these submarines, and you go out and kill that $14 billion Ford class aircraft carrier, or you kill a $4 billion, $5 billion ballistic missile class submarine, Ohio-class submarine. And by the way, those technologies are going to be in the hands of state and non-state actors sooner rather than later. These are the kind of things we should be looking at. These are huge cost-savings technologies – they’re deadly, dangerous technologies. We need to have protocols and standards, international law and other things in place for their use. His so-called America First Budget will also increase funding for local law enforcement, while cutting funds to the EPA, State Department, foreign aid and social programs. Cyber warfare, as you were talking about, going after people’s networks – nowhere, of course, is there anyone more vulnerable than ourselves to that kind of warfare. These are the items, the technologies of the future, not aircraft carriers, not stealth fighter planes. So, you know, I would rather see the Pentagon thinking along those lines, developing systems along those lines, and getting a lot leaner in the process rather than getting more money, which is just going to kind of make them very comfortable with their current ways, all of which are dangerous for our future. You got a pretty good look at a very senior level of how military policy is established. The military-industrial complex lobbies, they get expensive weapons systems, but they fund various members of the Senate and Congress and so on. I mean, how much is this just rather banal ways of having weapons systems to make people that own these manufacturers wealthier? In the late 1970s, Paul, when I was a major working on the high–mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle, now called commonly the Hummer, I was told by the Congress to go back to Fort Benning at the time and I had a $400 million program and they said you gotta have a bigger program, gotta have a bigger program, it’s gotta be in every state you can get it in. I went back and developed a $9 billion program for a 59,000-vehicle buy, and sold the program. Medicare and social security are apparently not on the budgetary chopping block. Now we have helicopters and fighter planes and ships and other things built, a component of which is built in every state. I’m not saying that when the president says he wants a war he goes to the Congress and they say, well, here it is, but I am saying that when they make a decision to support him, when the president even makes a decision to go to war, all this money, all of this commercial interest, all of these jobs, are very much in their minds. Trump’s plan is only in the outlining stage, and the final plan should be revealed in the upcoming weeks. Now joining us to discuss this budget increase for the Pentagon is Larry Wilkerson who joins us from Williamsburg.

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Indian Defence News

Reliance Infrastructure Limited (RInfra) and its promoted Reliance Defense Limited (RDL) & Reliance Defense and Engineering Limited (RDEL – Pipavav) held an Analyst Meet on Monday, the 27 February, 2017 in Mumbai. During the meet, the Company discussed various aspects with respect to the Defense business i.e. market,�opportunities and initiatives by RInfra. 1. In January 2016, RInfra has acquired management control of Pipavav Defense Offshore and Engineering Company Limited (PDOECL) now renamed as Reliance Defense and Engineering Limited (RDEL). Reliance Shipyard has world class infrastructure facility to undertake all types of construction / refit / life cycle support of Warships, Submarines, Commercial vessels (including large bulk carriers), Oil & Gas platforms / rigs. 2. It has received 27 industrial licenses in last year for manufacturing of various defense hardware / equipment for Army, Navy and Air Force. This is the highest number of Industrial Licenses for any Defense Company in India. It is the largest offset contract in the history of India at approx. 7. An experienced team is in place to implement the plans and initiatives in Defense sector. 1. More than Rs. 5,00,000 Crore of Indian Aerospace programs are expected to awarded in the next 15 years. a) Dassault Reliance Aerospace Limited, a JV Company with Reliance holding a stake of 51% is to be a key player along with more than 100 SMEs & MSMEs in meeting the offset obligation of approx. b) Dassault Reliance JV will provide Performance Based Logistics for 50 years (scope includes maintenance, repair, overhaul and upgrades) and it is expected to execute additional orders of Rafael Fighter Aircraft, if awarded, for Indian Armed Forces under ?Make in India?. 1. Offset obligations are integral part of the defense contracts and prevalent in many counties including India. India with a spending of USD 51 Billion in the year 2016 has moved up to 4th position from 6th position in the year 2015. Offset obligations ensure exports from India and is instrumental in creating a defense eco-system in the country. 2. Currently, the overall India Offset opportunities is in excess of Rs. 77,000 Crore. c) The Shipyard has two Goliath cranes of 600 tons each, with lifting capacity of 1,200 Tons in tandem. e) Currently, Reliance Shipyard is the only Shipyard in India capable of building a new Aircraft Carrier of 65,000 Ton and above. 4. Reliance Shipyard is the first Shipyard in India to be selected by U.S. 2. Indian Defense budget is Rs. 2,62,000 Crore for FY 2017-18, an increase of 5% over the last year budget. The scope includes complex repair and alteration for more than 100 ships of 7th Fleet of U.S. 6. The naval defense market size is likely to be more than Rs. 3,50,000 Crore in the next 15 years. 2. The Integrated Security vertical to focus on Border Security, Air field security and security of critical / sensitive installations / assets across the country. The capital acquisitions of defense hardware in next 10 years is expected to be approx. 4. The defense Land Systems (primarily supply to Indian and security solutions) opportunity is likely to be approx. 1. Defense Systems and Technology caters to common technology / equipment across all the defense segments namely Army, Navy and Air Force. The technologies are used to build various common equipment such as Radars, Electro-optics, C4I system (Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence), Underwater systems, Missiles and Guided Weapons, Avionics, Communication and Electronic Warfare. 3. Government of India has undertaken substantial changes in the defense policies with a specific focus on “Make in India” thereby creating a conducive business environment for Private Sector participation for capability and capacity creation / utilization. 4. RInfra is committed to develop a robust defense business contributing significantly to the national security and to be self-reliant in defense segment. 3. India is the largest importer of defense products accounting for 14% of the total global imports in the year 2016. 5. RInfra is confident of becoming one of the leading Defense Companies in India. 4. India will have Rs. 86,000 Cr of defense expenditure in the year 2017-18. This will offer large opportunities for Indian Private Sector Defense Companies, given renewed thrust by Government of India towards ?Make in India? in the Defense sector.

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Air Force removes posters from Langley AFB following complaints about religion, sexism

Air Force removes posters from Langley AFB following complaints about religion, sexism

Air Force Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor stealth fighter aircraft is parked inside a hangar during the inaugural Trilateral Exercise between the U.S. But after the first complaint was dismissed, the National Organization for Women submitted a second complaint. “General, there is simply no compromise when it comes to fighting the bigotry of sexism nor the prejudice of religious triumphalism,” she continued. “Women are just as patriotic, just as dedicated and just as worthy of our nation’s trust as their male counterparts.” “With additional time to review all seven posters outside the narrower, primarily religious context of the original complaint about two of them,” Air Combat Command spokeswoman Maj. “We’ve chosen to update the display with something that reflects the diverse and inclusive force we are today,” she added. Air Force, United Kingdom’s Royal Air Force and the French Air Force at Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Hampton, Virginia, on Dec. Officials at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, Virginia, removed several posters after the National Organization for Women and the Military Religious Freedom Foundation said they were sexist and overly religious. The foundation, on behalf of 16 clients, first filed its complaint about two posters that featured language from a 1955 Air Force manual that frequently references “faith,” according to The Virginian-Pilot. According to the Air Combat Command, “The display does not endorse, disapprove of, or extend preferential treatment for any faith, belief, or absence of belief.”

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It’s alive! Lightning strike turns Seattle’s Space Needle into a scene …

It’s alive! Lightning strike turns Seattle’s Space Needle into a scene …

As if that weren’t enough to tie up downtown traffic, authorities were also dealing with a morning accident that left a tanker truck filled with liquid petroleum gas overturned on Interstate 5. All lanes of traffic in both directions were shut down in both directions. “Hopefully, the lightning won’t get near the overturned truck,” Mass wrote. Tickets are now on sale for our biggest event of the year: The GeekWire Anniversary Bash on March 15th. We’ll be bringing back the ping-pong paddles, dodgeball courts, foosball tables, beer pong, video games, arcades, sumo wrestling, cornhole, and MORE at Seattle’s biggest, geekiest tech party. “The heavy precipitation is driving the freezing/snow levels towards the surface, and there is mixed rain/snow here at the UW,” Mass said. “Did you notice how the snow was associated with the heaviest precipitation?” Heavy, wet, fluffy snow happens when part of the atmosphere is near or just above freezing, causing snowflakes to melt partially and stick together as they fall. The snow came in two waves: one in the morning, and another around 3:30 p.m., just in time for the height of the afternoon commute. There were also some impressive displays of lightning, including a significant strike on the Space Needle.

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What we know about the 2018 SpaceX mission to the Moon

What we know about the 2018 SpaceX mission to the Moon

Tech billionaire Elon Musk, founder of the pioneering space transport company SpaceX, has announced a mission to fly two people to the moon next year in what would be a landmark moment for space travel. The moon is about 240,000 miles away from the Earth, and the travelers will do a flyby of the lunar surface before returning to Earth. SpaceX was the first private company to launch a spacecraft into orbit and safely return it to Earth in 2010, and the first commercial enterprise to fly to the space station in 2012 on a supply mission. SpaceX was conducting a fueling test on Launch Pad 40 at Cape Canaveral when the incident took place, an engineer at the Kennedy Space Center told ABC News at the time. “At 5 million pounds of liftoff thrust, Falcon Heavy is two-thirds the thrust of Saturn V and more than double the thrust of the next largest launch vehicle currently flying,” SpaceX said in a statement Monday. It would be the first manned mission into deep space since the end of the Apollo program in the early 1970’s. The company itself is valued in the billions, and the rockets themselves are multi-million dollar instruments, but the overall cost of this kind of personalized space mission remains unknown at this time. “This should be a really exciting mission that hopefully gets the world really excited about sending people into deep space again,” Musk said about the journey, which will mark a first for the nascent industry of space tourism.

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75 Percent of the Fighter and Attack Aircraft in the U.S …

75 Percent of the Fighter and Attack Aircraft in the U.S …

About 75 percent of the fighter and attack aircraft in the US Marine Corps-AV-8B Harriers, F-18A+/B/C Hornets, and EA-6B Prowlers-are out of service. The Marines are loving their F-35Bs so far, but the Lightning IIs are very expensive aircraft, particular when thrown against enemies who lack air forces-or even high-altitude air defense. The Corps is already intending to buy enough to outfit all 79 of their KC-130Js with MX-20 sensor balls, Intrepid Tiger jamming pods, and launch rails for Hellfire, Griffin and Viper Strike missiles. The first engagement (with a Hellfire) was over Afghanistan in November 2010, so the Marines have some experience with this idea. The Harvest Hawk doesn’t bring gatling guns or the awesome sensor suite of the AC-130s, but it has killed a lot of Taliban. All in all, the kits are in production, marines are trained to operate the aircraft, and the tanker-transport squadrons are flying every day. As quotidian bomb trucks, they have far greater range than Hornets and Harriers, but that approach will put Marine Corps Aviation back into the same cycle of destruction it has experienced over the past 15 years. While the details are yet forthcoming, the kit will include a telescopic forward-looking infrared sensor, a laser designator, and a launcher for the same repertoire of missiles as the KC-130J. The armed Ospreys will escort the transport Ospreys (which easily outrun the AH-1Z Viper gunships) to the landing zones, just without Robert Duvall. The kits are coming, marines are trained to operate the aircraft, and the tilt-rotor squadrons are flying every day, with rising availability. In the slightly longer run, as Kevin Murray argued in the October 2016 issue of Marine Corps Gazette, the Marines could buy something like the MQ-9 Reaper or the MQ-1C Grey Eagle, and fly it from bases ashore. The aircraft are in production, and the Air Force and the Army have units with crews. To keep this in-house, the Marine Corps would need to send its own people through training, and organize their own squadrons of large attack drones. This could seem duplicative of the USAF and the Army’s activities with the MQ-9 Reaper and the MQ-1C Grey Eagle, but it’s not as though the drones are undertasked today. Buying squadron-sets of bigger drones could also permit the Marine Corps to build some competency in flying a drone larger than the 545 RQ-21 Blackjacks it’s buying. The alternative is to move towards a mix of attack aircraft tailored for two classes of enemy, in wars small and large. Both aircraft types are better suited for the small wars in which the Marine Corps has been engaged for most of the post-Cold War era. For now, that might seem to destroy Marine Aviation, but to save it in the long term for the big wars.

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Nigerian Air Force fighter aircraft destroys Boko Haram …

Nigerian Air Force fighter aircraft destroys Boko Haram …

Whereas the insurgents, on sighting the attacking aircraft, fled for cover under nearby trees, the vehicles were attacked and were completely engulfed in an inferno. Get the latest News on NAIJ.com News App”Follow-up battle damage assessment (BDA) by NAF ISR aircraft revealed that the air strike was successful as the vehicles were completely destroyed as shown by the footage of the operation. “The objective is to prevent the remnants of the BHT from regrouping with a view to launching attack on own troops on clearance operations as well as people within the host communities,” it added.

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What’s caught Adrian Newey’s eye this season?

What’s caught Adrian Newey’s eye this season?

The Ferrari’s sidepods and the front suspension on the Mercedes and Toro Rosso are among the technical details that have caught the eye of Red Bull’s chief technical officer Adrian Newey. “Obviously there are a few different interpretations of the regulations which is what one might hope for with a new set of regulations,” he said on the first day of testing. “In particular the Mercedes looks like a complicated car, it’s got a lot of parts on it which will be about trying to manipulate the vortices to position the flow structures around the car. It’s probably fair to say that over the coming weeks we will have a good look at other peoples cars and decide which bits are interesting and which we want to investigate for ourselves. “Is that a fundamental advantage that the rest of us will end up copying in coming seasons is impossible to say for us because we don’t know if it’s something that will work on our car or not.”

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Hypersonic planes are ‘inevitable’ and will revolutionise … – Daily Mail – Daily Mail

Hypersonic planes are ‘inevitable’ and will revolutionise … – Daily Mail – Daily Mail

Aviation giants now say hypersonic flight is an ‘inevitable’ step that will revolutionize travel, and the US is calling for more commitment and funding to help them lead the way. According to the experts, however, bringing this technology to practical use over land will require significant reductions in the sonic booms caused by the craft, and numerous firms are now working to tackle this challenge. According to Knight, the US has not gone hypersonic in a plane since 1967 – and despite two unpiloted hypersonic programs, X-51 and X-43, the work was not continued, Space.com reports. This past February, NASA granted a contract to Lockheed Martin for the design of an experimental plane to test technologies that would reduce the sonic booms. But we can be the country to do it first, but we’re going to have to put our minds to it, and we’re going to have to stop the history of fits and starts, of throwing money at a big program, achieving a wild success, and then having no follow-up. Just months ago, it was revealed that plans for a revolutionary hypersonic propulsion system have taken a big step toward the construction of a ground demonstrator – but at roughly a quarter the size of the original vision. Reaction Engines Ltd has scaled back its design for the Sabre engine to bring about a demonstrator that is more affordable and better suited to early applications, including a potential X-plane. The Oxfordshire-based firm has been developing a turbine that combines both jet and rocket technologies to achieve rates five times the speed of sound, to fly anywhere in the world in just four hours. Rather than aiming for a demonstrator that can achieve more than 150,000 lb thrust, the firm will instead now target an engine size capable of roughly 44,000 lb thrust, according to Aviation Week Network. In the new plans for the Sabre demonstrator, researchers will target a smaller engine similar in size to the F135 engine for the F-35 joint Strike Fighter (JSF). Such a system, scaled back due to the slowness of funding, could be used in multistage vehicles or hypersonic craft the size of an X-plane. In an application for something like Skylon, the engine would have four combustion chambers connecting to the single nozzle, a bypass system and the same turbomachinery, intake and heat exchanger. Five panellists spoke at the Forum on American Aeronautics at the Mohave Air and Space Port in California to discuss the breakthroughs and challenges in supersonic and hypersonic flight. ‘There is a view that you could modularize the engine to a far higher degree, so that you could have four compressors and still have a large heat exchanger. Along with a JSF-sized engine for the ground demonstrator, the firm plans to solve the power gap between air-breathing and rocket engines. While the engine is still in the design phase, the firm plans to see three main test phases stretching into the 2020s. It’s hoped that the first test will take place within the next 12-15 months, the CEO tells AWN, with a focus on the heat exchanger and the core. In the third phase, the firm is looking toward concepts of an X-plane or flight demonstration aircraft to put it to the test. ‘What’s exciting about aerospace today is that we are in a point here where suddenly, things are happening all across the board in areas that just haven’t been happening for quite a while,’ former US Air Force Maj.

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The Age of Drones: All You Need To Know About India’s Attempts To Produce Unmanned Aerial Vehicles – Swarajya

The Age of Drones: All You Need To Know About India’s Attempts To Produce Unmanned Aerial Vehicles – Swarajya

DakshThen there is the Daksh, designed for the delicate and dangerous task of bomb disposal. The Indian Navy is expected to order 10 such AUVs for ISR, mine mitigation and sensor deployment, communication couriers and for target practice during exercises. The Inevitability Of Imports As with most weapon systems of the three services, the process of induction of UAVs began with imports. Between them, the three services have only about 100 Searcher Mk IIs, while 50 to 60 Heron 1s are shared between the IAF and the Indian Navy.However, for the last year or two, the outlook has been rapidly improving, because of increased government commitment as well as its June 2016 decision to join the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR). Some estimates are that India is likely to procure more than 5,000 UAVs over the next 10 years at a cost of over $3 billion. Capable of being remotely controlled over a range of 500m line-of-sight (LOS) or even within buildings, it is an important asset in the hands of the Indian Army, Police and Paramilitary Forces. These include high altitude long endurance (HALE) UAVs, MALE UAVs, vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) UAVs and tactical UAVs going all the way down to mini- and micro-UAVs for the Indian Army. In November 2016, the high-powered Defence Acquisition Council (DAC) approved the purchase of 598 mini-UAVs for the infantry, under the ‘Buy Indian’ category. According to official sources, they will be used for aerial surveillance of areas up to five to seven kilometres ahead of the area of responsibility. The IAF and the Indian Navy will also have several squadrons each of surveillance UAVs and UCAVs. It is estimated that the Indian armed forces plan to induct over 200 armament-capable UAVs in the next 10 years. In November 2016, the Indian government signed a $400-million deal to purchase 10 IAI Heron TP UAVs (also known as Eitan) for the IAF. It will be an invaluable asset should more cross-border surgical strikes be planned.The Heron TP has a wingspan of 26m and length of 14m. According to the manufacturer, it has a maximum take-off weight of 4,650kg and carries a typical mission payload of 1,000kg. Major Imports From The US Of even greater importance is the possibility that India will purchase advanced UAVs and UCAVs from the US. Most likely to be inducted are 22 Predator XP unarmed UAVs for the Indian Navy. Since getting enough combat aircraft is proving such a daunting task and may take perhaps a couple of decades, military planners are trying to quickly increase the IAF’s firepower through armed UAVs and UCAVs. They would be the system of choice to take out terrorist camps or infrastructure and might lead the first wave against enemy air defence systems or vital targets deep inside enemy territory in the event of an all-out war. A Brighter Unmanned Future Depends On The Private Sector Of late, the Indian government has renewed its efforts to make up for lost time and manufacture or import various types of unmanned systems in large numbers, realising that they will be an important factor in any future conflict. There is a crying need for the DRDO to be more realistic in its claims of successes and rosy projections for the future, as well as more reliable in its development time and cost estimate. For instance, key to safe aerial unmanned operations outside of military airspace is a compact and foolproof collision avoidance system and this is still not available indigenously. But key to the process will be the organisation’s ability to stick to deadlines and cost estimates as well as to deliver a product of impeccable quality. There are two broad types of UUVs: autonomous undersea vehicles (AUVs) that can operate independently without human inputs for most or all phases of operation and remotely operated-undersea vehicles (ROVs) where a human operator is essential. Further in the future is DRDO’s autonomous unmanned research aircraft (AURA) for the IAF and the Indian Navy. There is a growing realisation that unless the private sector is involved in a big way, it will be impossible to even partially satisfy the demand for military unmanned systems through indigenous sources. To encourage a future that will be less dependent on the DRDO, many major UAV systems can be outsourced to competent and qualified Indian firms. It is heartening that various systems of the Tapas 201 such as the airframe, landing gear and sub-systems for flight control and avionics, were developed within the country with the collaboration of private industries. According to Tata Advanced Systems Limited (TASL), the firm is well-positioned to build entire aircraft and UAVs for defence customers under the ‘Make in India’ programme. Reliance Defence and L&T Heavy Engineering too are quite capable of developing and manufacturing small UAVs on their own and they can gradually move up the value chain. Therefore, even for imports, tenders are to be restricted to domestic companies that can tie up with foreign firms to ‘Make in India’.India’s holdings of unmanned systems are clearly inadequate for a country of this size. UUVs have the potential to revolutionise naval warfare just as UAVs are transforming air-land warfare.The Naval Science and Technological Laboratory (NSTL), Visakhapatnam, under the DRDO, is developing various AUVs small and large. This is, perhaps, due to uncertain commitment from the users in the past, inadequate funding and over-reliance on the DRDO’s ability to deliver. Concerted efforts are, therefore, necessary to equip the country’s armed forces with adequate UAVs and other unmanned systems for critical ISR tasks as well as to meet the threat of cross-border terrorist attacks. According to NSTL, with the completion of user evaluation trials, the AUV’s basic design is ready.

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